Is Tinder driving increasing incidence of gonorrhoea?

Is swiping right giving us gonorrhoea? That’s what Flinders University researchers are hoping to find out.

Incidence of gonorrhoea is increasing worldwide and recent trends in South Australia have seen the biggest increases among young, heterosexual people in low socio-economic areas.

Combined with increasing antibiotic resistance and absence of a vaccine, there is a strong need to identify ways to reduce the risk of gonorrhoea and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as HIV.

Flinders University’s Dr Emma Miller will use a Health Seed Grant from Flinders Foundation to explore the role of dating app Tinder in the rising rates of gonorrhoea

Tinder is the most commonly used dating app in Australia and is often associated with casual and unprotected sex.

By interviewing Tinder users from high and low socio-economic areas, Dr Miller hopes to explore young people’s Tinder use and learn how this shapes their sexual behaviour, while also understanding their gonorrhoea risk perception.

This study aims to understand changes in sexual behaviour among young people and their experiences regarding STIs, and identify ways to reduce the risk of gonorrhoea and other STIs.

This study is the first of its kind to provide information on the role of Tinder in shaping sexual behaviour and STI risk.

This study is the first of its kind to provide information on the role of Tinder in sexually transmitted infection risk.


Project title: Is Tinder driving increasing incidence of gonorrhoea in young heterosexual South Australians? 

Lead researcher: Dr Emma Miller

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